Solar and Wind Power Investors Get More Bang for Their Bucks – Bloomberg

Solar investment has increased by a factor of 11 since 2004. Solar installations have increased by a factor of 110. Today’s solar asset builders invest an order of magnitude more money than they did 15 years ago, and they build far more generation capacity. And, like wind projects, today’s solar projects generate significantly more energy … Continue reading Solar and Wind Power Investors Get More Bang for Their Bucks – Bloomberg

Musk says Tesla big battery to pay for itself within a few years, bigger ones on the way | RenewEconomy

While the Hornsdale battery that we built in South Australia is still the largest battery in the world, we have recently received multiple requests to build significantly larger battery projects,” Musk said in the statement. “The Hornsdale project has generated substantial savings and is likely to pay for itself within a few years. Source: Musk … Continue reading Musk says Tesla big battery to pay for itself within a few years, bigger ones on the way | RenewEconomy

Welcome to the abnormalization of transportation – TechCrunch

Ultimately, solutions, not sanctions, will allow cities to welcome this weird new transportation future and realize it’s transformative potential. The abnormalization of transportation presents a tremendous challenge for city officials, planners, and legislators. It’s a road worth traveling. — Read on techcrunch.com/2019/01/19/welcome-to-the-abnormalization-of-transportation/amp/

Why China’s electric-car industry is leaving Detroit, Japan, and Germany in the dust – MIT Technology Review

Guess how many EV companies that have launched in China since 2013....? 487! And 56% of Lithium ion batteries will be manufactured in China by 2020 according to the Wall Street Journal. Watch out the western car industry!   Source: Why China’s electric-car industry is leaving Detroit, Japan, and Germany in the dust - MIT Technology … Continue reading Why China’s electric-car industry is leaving Detroit, Japan, and Germany in the dust – MIT Technology Review